environment

February 2017

Climate change, the warming of the earth’s atmosphere, oceans and landmasses, is the pre-eminent issue facing humanity. 2016 was the hottest worldwide since record keeping began in 1880. The previous record year was 2015, and before that, 2014.

New Zealand earthquake exposes a government that is upping military spending while neglecting environmental safety

New Zealand earthquake exposes a government that is upping military spending while neglecting environmental safety
Alex Cole
issue 25
January 2017

November 2016 turned out more momentous than New Zealanders expected. Anti-war campaigners converged on Auckland to protest against international naval exercises celebrating the Royal New Zealand Navy’s 75th anniversary. Ships arrived from 15 countries, and the activists’ focus was the USS Sampson, the first U.S. warship to visit New Zealand in 33 years. New government regulations prevented protest boats from getting near the visiting naval vessels. However this didn’t stop protesters from blockading a weapons expo and shutting it down.

Three reasons to STOP Adani: Sovereignty, the Great Barrier Reef and our planet

Three reasons to STOP Adani: Sovereignty, the Great Barrier Reef and our planet
Alison Thorne
issue 25
January 2017

One of the most inspiring speakers I’ve heard recently is Murrawah Maroochy Johnson, a 20-year-old from the Wangan and Jagalingou people (WJP) of central Queensland. She spoke passionately about the battle to stop the Carmichael mine on her ancestral lands. Adani, an India-based multinational, plans to build one of the world’s biggest coal mines in the Galilee Basin, causing environmental devastation and reaping billions of dollars in profit.

December 2016

Standing Rock Unionists speak out

While at Standing Rock, Freedom Socialist Party representative and union carpenter Patrick Burns talks with Liam Cain, member of Laborers Union Local 1271 and the Industrial Workers of the World, about labor's role in defending Native rights and fighting the pipeline companies.

December 2016

Standing Rock Report-back – Gina Petry and Patrick Burns

Presentations by Freedom Socialist Party representative Patrick Burns and Seattle Radical Women Organizer Gina Petry about their November stay at Standing Rock, including video of interviews with members of the International Indigenous Youth Council and Labor for Standing Rock.

December 2016

The cold is settling in but the mood of Standing Rock is warm with solidarity. On Friday, Nov. 18, the International Indigenous Youth Council led a ceremony of 500 water protectors. We called for the release of Oglala Lakota tribal member Red Fawn Fallis, wrongly charged with firing at police and attempted murder.

December 2016

Indian-led encampments on Standing Rock Sioux territory are digging in for the North Dakota winter. They are determined to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline. And they are not alone, as thousands upon thousands join their bold struggle to save planet resources and peoples.

Already they have won a temporary victory from the government to halt the digging, but Dakota Access is moving equipment to tunnel under the Missouri River at Lake Oahe. And the Norway-based bank DNB has sold its pipeline assets and may terminate loans.

November 21, 2016

Police Attack Unarmed Water Protectors w/ Rubber Bullets, Tear Gas, and Water Cannons; 160+ injured

Cannon Ball, ND – Water protectors attempting to clear two damaged military trucks from Highway 1806 were met with a militarized response by law enforcement working to ensure the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Police used tear gas, water cannons, rubber bullets, concussion grenades, and more crowd control munitions.

November 2016

Report from Standing Rock

Days 6 and 7, November 20-21, 2016 – State warfare intensifies – solidarity builds

Our final days representing Radical Women and Freedom Socialist Party at Standing Rock were action-packed and compelling.

Members of the International Indigenous Youth Council and Gina Petry (right) with RW/FSP banner

Varied voices of water protectors

October 2016

When a security company set dogs on people challenging bulldozers in North Dakota on Sept. 3, the scalding images recalled similar violence against civil rights protesters in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963. And just as that Birmingham struggle was a defining moment, so too is the struggle for water and sovereignty by the Standing Rock Sioux and thousands of supporters, including nearly 300 Indian nations.

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